Farm-fresh approach to recording Folk musician David Mallett's do-it-yourself album is full of rich tunes BY BILL CRAIG SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT Mar 25, 2004 When David Mallett started out in the music business back in the'60s, he had a clear vision of the direction he expected his career to take. "For a long time, I had aspirations of being Neil Diamond with fans and people hanging around to tune my guitar and stuff," Mallett said over the phone from his Maine home. Mallett has more than a few items to brag about. He scored a legitimate hit single with "The Garden Song." (You and your kids may know the tune as "Inch by Inch.")...

OPEN SEASON A little body English worked for Boeheim Tom FitzGerald Wednesday, March 24, 2004 One of CBS's best replays during the Big Dance had to be Syracuse coach Jim Boeheim's sideline contortion as Maryland's last shot to tie missed. Says Phil Mushnick of the New York Post, "Boeheim looked like Ichabod Crane doing Joe Cocker." -- Among the interview quotes from Connecticut coach Jim Calhoun distributed by NCAA officials in Phoenix: "There are a lot of good teams. There's a lot of parody." -- A reader asked syndicated columnist Norman Chad, "Could you break the news to Billy Packer that he did not invent college ba...

Tuesday, Mar 23, 2004 A musician-trucker from Parksville goes Solitaire with Neil Diamond as an alter ego He ain't heavy ... He's Doug Kew He's a singer and his songs are sung blue. Sometimes they crackle with emotion. They ain't heavy. You find out he's not who you thought he was only after you see him. But by the time your eyes do size him up, it doesn't matter that he's not Neil Diamond. The voice is. Familiar, deep, soothing. Enough people have a craving for Diamond that they are bound in droves for the Funny Bone restaurant in Parksville to hear the message. You could say Doug Kew is a trapped truck driver. He's not r...

Will Eagles soar as it comes down to elite eight? 03/19/2004 Well, here we are folks, the final eight musical acts in our March Madness best musical act ever contest. The votes came in fast and furious. One group tried to sabotage the voting to get their guy into the next round, and still another major upset occurred. First of all, the Neil Diamond fanatics are just that ..fanatics. One person suggested to me that everyone is a closet Neil Diamond fan. I’m starting to believe he was right. Despite not counting the votes of one crazy Diamondhead slamming in hundreds of votes for Neil from various hotmail e-mail addresses in a...

Boise singer/songwriter finds friends in Nashville Dana Oland The Idaho Statesman Dale Keys knows a bit about serendipity. It has taken the singer and songwriter from Boise to Nashville, where he played his music in a recording studio alongside musicians he has idolized for most of his 41 years. “It been more than wild,” Keys says in phone interview from his Nashville apartment. He played with idols Dennis Crouch on bass and Stuart Duncan on steel guitar for his self-titled new album. “I watched them through binoculars at the ´Down From the Mountain´ concert at the Idaho Center, playing with Emmylou Harris. Then, 11 month...

Here's a toot of the horn for Chicago Transit Authority March 17, 2004 BY RICHARD ROEPER SUN-TIMES COLUMNIST The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's Class of 2004 is one of the strongest in history: the late George Harrison, Prince, Bob Seger, ZZ Top, Jackson Browne, Traffic -- and the pride of south suburban Harvey, the Dells, who have been recording since Eisenhower was president. If you put all the great songs from that bunch on your iPod, it would be weeks before you'd hear the same song twice. These prolific and gifted artists created uniquely beautiful sounds, insightful lyrics and memorable hooks that have stood the test of ...

Nick to put imitation skill on record Mar 16 2004 By Stephen Hallmark Stars in their eyes finalist Nick McCullock is planning to release an album as a tribute to his hero Neil Diamond. After finishing third in the grand final of Saturday night's show, games shop area manager Nick is hoping to record his own material. Although the idea is still in its early days, Nick, 34, has already written plenty of material for a record which he hopes will launch his singing career. The debut album is to be called With Respect, and Nick has already sent the title track - about Neil Diamond - to his hero as a birthday present earlier t...

Come to Neil Diamond and Stay Forever By Bob Talbert Detroit Free Press June 30, 1976 I KNOW EXACTLY when I came to Neil Diamond. You probably know when you did, too. If you haven't, you will. We will all come for sure, in the coming decade, to this man who has already given us a decade of memories that stir and settle the still and moist places in our souls. You might have connected with him right off the start when he was with Bang Records or you may have discovered him for the first time this summer at Pine Knob. You could be discovering him right now if the radio is playing a cut from his new "Beautiful Noise" album. Or it...

Serious fire damage averted at building on Music Row By KATHY CARLSON Staff Writer If Charles English hadn't been there working last night, a Music Row building containing a studio used by the likes of Elvis Presley and Neil Diamond might have been seriously damaged in a two-alarm fire. English, who owns a music publishing company, alerted emergency workers to the fire that hit the three-story brick and stone office building at 30 Music Square W. about 7:15 p.m. ''You wouldn't normally … think (the building) would be occupied at this time,'' said Assistant Nashville Fire Chief Kim Lawson. ''That fire would have progressed r...

Diamong beats Stones in March Madness By Anthony SanFilippo , Times Music Writer 03/12/2004 And the results are... I don't know how many of the hundreds of music fans who have been voting in this tournament are actually college basketball fans, but what we have here, in the second round of the Times' March Music Madness, are a several instances of Cinderella knocking off a heavy favorite to reach the sweet 16. Probably the biggest stunner is Neil Diamond knocking off the Rolling Stones. Not one of the 16 second-round contests was a blowout like in the first round. Many of the contests came down to only a few votes. T...

Fans get a full Neil deal Polished tribute act draws new generation of Diamondheads By ERIC BARTELS Issue date: Fri, Mar 12, 2004 The Tribune -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Lead singer Surreal Neil of the Neil Diamond tribute band Super Diamond vividly remembers his first meeting with the real Neil. "The first thing he said was, 'Thank you for doing what you're doing,' " says 38-year-old Randy Cordero. "I said, 'Thank you for not suing us.' " Cordero says Diamond's retinue is grateful for the nearly 11 years that Super Diamond has spent steering new generations of c...

Posted 3/11/2004 9:45 PM Today's Top Life Stories Evolution of pop By Ken Barnes and Elysa Gardner, USA TODAY Pop music for adults was the only game in town 50 years ago, and now it just might be coming full circle again. USA TODAY's Ken Barnes and Elysa Gardner chart its evolution. Sarah McLachlan's Lilith Fair concept offered an alternative to the testosterone rock fests at the time. USA TODAY 1954 All popular music, aside from regional/ethnic pockets of R&B and country, is adult pop, a situation reflected by radio. Rock 'n' roll is about to change all that. 1960 Rock 'n' roll makes inroads, but Rat Pa...

Rock Music Menu: It’s not about selling the music, anymore By ANTHONY J. SANFILIPPO , asanfilippo@delcotimes.com 03/05/2004 So I’m sitting up past the witching hour, as I usually do, channel surfing for something -- anything -- to pique my interest. Anyway, this week, I was actually intrigued by a three-part special report on ESPN talking about sex and sports and how they’re now intertwined so much, it’s hard to imagine one without the other. Watching this got me thinking about the same correlation in the world of music. Then I see Britney Spears opening her Onyx Hotel tour in San Diego, baring a lot of skin -- enhanced ...

A Dizzying Ride on the Turntable By JANET MASLIN Published: March 5, 2004 G. Paul Burnett/The New York Times Walter Yetnikoff, the author of "Howling at the Moon." Late in Walter Yetnikoff's memoir, when his career at CBS Records is on the rocks, and Barbra, Bruce and Mick have stopped speaking to him, he cites a former associate's remark: "The business is boring without you." Now, with slingshot in hand, Mr. Yetnikoff settles old scores while providing a book-length occasion to contemplate what those words mean. If there are other contenders for this year's Robert Evans Award for Self-Promoting Show Business Reminiscence, th...

Bellamy Brothers perform in Santa Ynez By The Record Staff 3/3/04 Nashville -- Multi-Platinum country legends, The Bellamy Brothers, will perform one show only at 8 p.m. Wednesday, March 24, at the Maverick Saloon in Santa Ynez. Tickets -- $30 in advance and $35 at the door -- are available through the Maverick Saloon by calling 805-686-4785. The Bellamy Brothers' unique country reggae sound (a sun and beach mentality mixed with country roots) established a career spanning over 25 years. Since the Bellamy's first hit the charts in 1976 with "Let Your Love Flow," the duo has scored more overall hits than any other duo in the history...

The dress makes the man By Patricia McFall Tadashi Shoji, official designer of this year’s Rose Queen and Court gowns, was born and raised in Sendai, a gray industrial town in Japan with a cold climate, both temperature and artistically. It was an unlikely playground for the future artist and fashion designer, whose originality, individualism and creativity were bound to arouse more suspicion or even hostility than encouragement. As soon as he was able, he went straight to Tokyo, where there was a "climate of openness.’’ There Tadashi studied four years with Jiro Takamatsu, the avant-garde artist often credited with bringing Japa...

talent By Nathaniel Miller Herald Arts & Entertainment Editor Tracy Grammer, folk musician and ex-partner (musical and otherwise) for the late legendary singer-songwriter Dave Carter, performs Friday evening at the Abbey Theatre. Grammer said that, if she ever quits music, she might be a full-time producer of records. You've got to carry on. That's what Tracy Grammer does, and she's shouldering the weight of two. The folky musician/producer and ex-partner of the late songwriting guru Dave Carter performs Friday evening at the Abbey Theatre. Grammer will be joined by Jim Henry, another Portland-based multi-instrumentalist...

Sadly, This Doesn't Fix Tone Deafness When your company's team-building karaoke turns "scary-oke," here's one way to keep it in the office. From: Issue 80 | March 2004, Page 35 By: Ryan Underwood Photographs by: Sebastian Gollings Karaoke--the ancient japanese art of belting out forgotten Neil Diamond tunes--is, for better or worse, all the corporate team-building rage. Now Microsoft is joining in, outfitting its popular Xbox with a karaoke add-on. No need to lug rented equipment and CDs to your next office retreat. Just download songs from XboxKaraoke.com to the Xbox's hard drive, grab the sing-along microphone, and you've got days...

Robbie Williams · Escapology "Ya'll know who I am/I'm still the boy next door/That's if you're Lord Lichfield and Roger Moore" sings the devilishly handsome and oft-charming Robbie Williams on his fourth Canadian release Escapology. It's good to know that not much has changed for the ego. He and his longtime writing partner Guy Chambers are still trying to tell us in their witty way that Robbie's famous, it's hard and he's certainly not normal. In the rousing anthem "Monsoon" Robbie scolds all the ladies he's loved (I'm glad that spending the night with me / Guaranteed you celebrity), in "Come Undone" he struggles with the pressures...

Analysts, start your theories NASCAR Dads: a powerful swing bloc or political fiction? Political scientists can't agree BY KIRSTEN B. MITCHELL MEDIA GENERAL NEWS SERVICE Feb 29, 2004 WASHINGTON - Angry White Males were first. Then came Soccer Moms. Now NASCAR Dads are the darlings of pollsters and pundits. Not so fast, says Charlie Cook, who publishes a political newsletter in Washington. He proposes putting the brakes on the phrase. "[T]his business about the 'NASCAR dad' being the swing voter group of the 2004 election, or any other national election, is one of the dumbest ideas I've heard in my 32 years in and around p...

Article Published: Friday, February 27, 2004 at the clubs Railbenders' down-home country on track By Kat Valentine Hitch a ride with the Railbenders and they will take you on a backroads tour of whiskey bars, railroad and the wilder West. Denver's own honky-tonk heroes, the Railbenders bring their brand of down-home country music to the Climax Lounge tonight, for the last in a series of CD release parties celebrating their latest effort, "Segundo," an ode to classic country. "I'm kind of stuck in the past," said singer and guitarist Jim Dalton."We like Waylon, Willie, and Johnny. Just straight-ahead, '70s style country. We're...

Rock Music Menu: March Madness time for music lovers By ANTHONY J. SANFILIPPO , asanfilippo@delcotimes.com 02/27/2004 Most mornings, when I check my voice mail, there is a lengthy message from one of my regular readers -- a guy from Glenolden who goes by the moniker "Nugent." He always goes on a five-minute diatribe, mostly mocking my column, but also venturing into the world of sports. The guy loves to pontificate about the most topical sports stories in the city of Philadelphia. So, while he was rambling, he suddenly became my muse, giving me an idea that I hope you will embrace. Stealing an idea from other sources and...

Many faces of TV show winner Feb 18 2004 By Dean Valler Few of the millions of viewers watching Coventry crooner Nick McCullock triumph in Stars in their Eyes would guess his past career - as a Chippendales-style stripper. Nick, 34, of Exhall, was a beefcake who spent 18 months in the early 90s travelling around the UK and the rest of Europe performing with the Centurions male strip show. When he broke away from the group - to be replaced by Chris Quentin, who played Brian Tilsley in Coronation Street - he formed his own team, The Olympians. Nick, who also counts a previous career running bungee jumping on the Greek island...

Review: 'Jest in Time' an upbeat night of comedy By MAXINE GINSBERG, Special to the Daily News February 17, 2004 While the dopey drivers on U.S. 41 and the diminished capacities of advancing age have put a furrow on many a brow, Fred Tobias finds them fodder for funniness, grist for giggles, and the stuff that screams are made of. There were plenty of all three when he and his wife, Lee Tobias, performed "Jest in Time," Saturday night at Gulfview Middle School. About 80 showgoers laughed their way through a generous program that poked fun at plastic surgery, performance enhancement drugs (and they don't mean steroids), retirem...

Australian Teen Star Goodrem Takes on America By Christie Eliezer and Emmanuel LeGrand SYDNEY (Billboard) - The past year has been extraordinary for 19-year-old Australian pop sensation Delta Goodrem (news). Now it is time to see if the rest of the world is ready for the latest sensation from Down Under. The stats are impressive: In January, her Sony Music debut album, "Innocent Eyes," which spawned five No. 1 singles, notched the longest stay at No. 1 for a domestic album on the Australian Record Industry Assn. (ARIA) charts. At 29 weeks at No. 1, it surpassed Neil Diamond (news)'s 1973 live set "Hot August Night" for th...

Double Diamond set to shine By Ingrid Paulsen News Group staff It took just over three decades for Bill Zaalberg to realize what it really meant to shine as a performer. The singer and multi-instrumentalist began his musical career in 1975 in a trio, but it was only recently he took his years of combined experience to mastermind an 11-piece show of local talent under the name Double Diamond. "I spent 16 years at the Esquimalt Legion. We started doing impersonation shows and ended up having a run of 34 shows, every Wednesday. All four of us would come with different characters every week," says Zaalberg. He had toured as a mu...

Neil Diamond Tribute come to Gryphon Theatre in Barrie Ontario Feb 13, 04 | 12:58 pm Bobby Bruce is the closest thing to the real Neil Diamond. He is a dynamic performer and his show, Nearly Neil, has captivated audiences all over the world! This flamboyant performer has created his own performance based on Diamond’s music, and has been touring Nearly Neil since 1993. A child model and actor, Bobby was a successful musical theatre performer when he donned his first sequined shirt. The demand for Bobby’s thrilling re-creation of the music and magic of Neil Diamond, including the favourite Sweet Caroline, and his incredible showmanship, ...

'15 Minutes' and more: a roundup of some recent shows Friday February 13, 2004 By Keith Spera Music writer Revisiting a clutch of recent shows . . . The "15 Minutes Singer/Songwriter Night" second anniversary celebration Tuesday at The Parish of the House of Blues served up an engaging, eclectic and (mostly) acoustic procession of songwriters. Susan Cowsill applied her open ache of a voice to "Snow," a track dating to her tenure with the Continental Drifters, but mostly showcased fresh compositions, including one she finished minutes before the gig. With her husband, Russ Broussard, on drums, and Chris Knotts' understa...

Nick to be a dazzling Diamond Feb 12 2004 By Stephen Hallmark A computer games manager will on Saturday utter the famous words “Tonight Matthew, I am going to be...” And then Nick McCullock will step into the spotlight as ’70s singer Neil Diamond. Viewers will see him turn in a sparkling performance as Diamond on the popular Stars in Their Eyes show, where people get the chance impersonate big-name singers. Nick, of Exhall, near Coventry, covers Diamond’s Cracklin’ Rosie, and says he thoroughly enjoyed all the trappings of fame on his big night. Diamond was at the height of his fame in the ’70s and had a string of ball...

SESAC heads for Gulch February 10, 2004 SESAC, the smallest of the performing rights organization, is outgrowing its headquarters on Music Row and looking to expand into a new building in the Gulch two years from now. When the current owners bought SESAC in October of 2002, the organization had about 65 employees, said its president, Bill Velez. SESAC now has 110 employees and will be adding more. Year after year, SESAC - whose 4,000 songwriter members include Bob Dylan and Neil Diamond - has experienced incremental growth particularly in its licensing and royal distribution departments. "A lot of the growth has been inh...

Bryans win doubles to clinch quarterfinal spot for United States HOWARD FENDRICH, AP Tennis Writer Saturday, February 7, 2004 (02-07) 12:41 PST UNCASVILLE, Conn. (AP) -- Moments after clinching a Davis Cup quarterfinal berth, twins Bob and Mike Bryan began a victory lap around the court with a giant U.S. flag. As Neil Diamond's "America" blared over the arena's speakers, the world's top-ranked doubles team was joined in the jog by former singles No. 1 Andy Roddick and Robby Ginepri, who just cracked the top 25. U.S. captain Patrick McEnroe smiled and applauded as he watched the celebration, knowing this quartet of ...

Davis Cup roundup: U.S. clinches quarterfinal berth UNCASVILLE, Conn. (AP) — Ah, home sweet home. Twins Bob and Mike Bryan dominated Jurgen Melzer and Julian Knowle of Austria 6-2, 6-1, 6-4 Saturday, allowing the United States to clinch a spot in the Davis Cup quarterfinals and improve to 28-0 in first-round series on American soil. The doubles victory followed Friday's singles wins by Andy Roddick and Robby Ginepri to give the hosts an insurmountable 3-0 lead in the best-of-five matchup. U.S. captain Patrick McEnroe's squad was upset by Croatia on the road in last year's first round. McEnroe has vowed that the United States wi...